Dr. Mike Burgio: February 16, 2017

THE WAR ON HEART DISEASE

HOW VETERANS AFFAIRS RESEARCHERS ARE WORKING TO FIGHT CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE

Dr. Mike Burgio

Cardiology Program Manager
VA Research and Development

 

 

blood vessels. It describes conditions ranging from peripheral artery disease and high blood pressure to heart attacks and strokes. It is also the number one killer of Americans, and is the leading cause of hospitalization in the VA health care system. Cardiovascular disease is particularly important to Veterans because it is associated with a number of other diseases that often affect them including diabetes, spinal cord injuries, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In addition to making Veterans and their families aware of the risk factors, VA researchers are developing new treatments for cardiovascular disease and helping to improve existing treatments.

On February 16th, Dr. Mike Burgio will be available for interviews to discuss some of the risk factors of cardiovascular disease and what the VA is doing to help Veterans fight the disease. He will also discuss highlights from recent studies that reveal the issues that veterans face.

Some of these highlights include:

·         Older men treated within the VA health care system for heart attacks are less likely to die within 30 days after the event than Medicare beneficiaries treated at other hospitals.

·         Veterans with PTSD are more likely to have reduced blood flow to the heart.

·         Women Veterans who underwent cardiac catheterization tended to be younger and more obese than men, and were more likely to have PTSD or depression.

More About Dr. Mike Burgio:

Michael Burgio, Ph.D., received his degree in Biology from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy NY where he studied the structure and function of small heat shock proteins.  Dr. Burgio moved to the Washington DC area to pursue his postdoctoral studies at the National Institutes of Health. There, his research included exploring global protein expression and interaction patterns in muscle myofibrils using proteomic techniques. In 2013 he joined the VA’s Office of Research and Development and is the Program Manager for cardiology research for the Biomedical Laboratory and Clinical Science research services.

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