Cherian Karunapuzha, MD: May 27, 2020

Could Your Unintentional, Uncontrollable Movements
be a Side Effect of Your Medication?

Dr. Cherian Karunapuzha discusses the impact of Tardive Dyskinesia (TD) and how it can cause physical changes that may lead to functional and emotional changes1,2,3

May is Mental Health Month

Cherian Karunapuzha, MD

Assistant Professor of Neurology at University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and Director of the OU Parkinson’s Disease & Movement Disorders Center

 

TD is associated with certain prescription medications used to treat mental health or gastrointestinal conditions, and affects a broad range of people.1,2,3 It is characterized by mild to severe twitching, shaking or jerking in the hands, feet, face, or torso, as well as involuntary blinking, tongue movements, and other unintentional, uncontrollable movements.1

 

Regardless of the severity of symptoms, the impact of TD can be significant, causing physical changes that may lead to functional and emotional changes and impacted social wellbeing – such as avoiding social interactions.1,2,3

 

It’s often family members and loved ones who first notice the signs of TD.1 During Mental Health Month, Dr. Karunapuzha is raising awareness of the condition and encouraging anyone who may be impacted to visit www.TardiveImpact.com.

 

On May 19, Dr. Karunapuzha will be available to discuss the signs and symptoms of TD and the impact it has on patients and loved ones.

 

For more information, visit: www.TardiveImpact.com

 

 

MORE ABOUT TARDIVE DYSKINESIA (TD):

TD affects a broad range of people who live with a variety of underlying medical conditions, including schizophrenia, depression, bipolar disorder, and gastrointestinal issues.1,2 Mild to severe twitching, shaking or jerking in the hands, feet, face, or torso, are signs of TD. Involuntary blinking, tongue movements, and other unintentional, uncontrollable movements can also be signs of TD. Signs and symptoms can appear as early as three months after an individual starts taking certain prescription medications, and the risk increases the longer an individual is taking one of these drugs.1,2,3 TD is estimated to affect at least 500,000 people in the U.S, and one in four people who are taking certain mental health medications may develop uncontrollable movements of TD. 2,4,5

 

ABOUT DR. CHERIAN KARUNAPUZHA:

Dr. Cherian Karunapuzha is a neurologist and movement disorder specialist in Oklahoma City, OK. He received his medical degree from the University of Kerala, with further training in neurology and movement disorders from University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas and has been in practice since 2001.

 

Currently, Dr. Karunapuzha serves as the Medical Director and movement disorder neurologist for the Meinders Center for Movement Disorders, Oklahoma City. Previously, he was an Assistant Professor of Neurology at the University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City and the Director of the OU Parkinson’s Disease & Movement Disorders Center. He is also a keen clinical educator who has received several teaching awards and is a frequently invited speaker for disease awareness programs in neurology given his in-depth knowledge and focus on psycho-pharmacology and patho-physiological aspects of the different diseases.

 

Focusing on community medicine, he has developed the first multidisciplinary center in Oklahoma for movement disorders incorporating physical and speech therapy with patient visits. He has developed clinics for the uninsured in tandem with patient support groups to improve statewide access to a movement disorder specialist as well as access to research trials. He is a national speaker, consultant and faculty for the pharmaceutical industry.

 

Produced for: Teva

 

Warikoo N, Schwartz T, Citrome L. Tardive dyskinesia. In: Schwartz TL, Megna J, Topel ME, eds. Antipsychotic Drugs: Pharmacology, Side Effects and Abuse Prevention. Hauppauge, NY: Nova Science Publishers, Inc; 2013:235-258. Accessed November 2019.

2 Waln O, Jankovic J. An update on tardive dyskinesia: from phenomenology to treatment. Tremor Other Hyperkinet Mov. 2013;3:1-11. Accessed November 2019.

Understanding TD. Mind website. https://www.mind.org.uk/media/2837360/understanding-tardive-dyskinesia-2015.pdf.  Accessed December 2019.

Tardive dyskinesia. MHA website. https://www.mhanational.org/conditions/tardive-dyskinesia. Accessed March 2020.

5 Tardive dyskinesia. Baylor College of Medicine website. https://www.bcm.edu/healthcare/care-centers/parkinsons/conditions/tardive-dyskinesia. Accessed March 2020.

 

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