Paul Singh, MD, MPH, BS: May 25, 2017

May is Stroke Awareness Month

Country’s Highest Death Rates from Stroke are Americans Living in the “Stroke Belt”[1]

Paul Singh, MD, MPH, BS

Assist. Professor, Neuroendovascular Surgery and Vascular Neurology at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School – Associate Director, The Comprehensive Stroke Center at University Hospital – Co-Director, Primary Stroke Center at Newark Beth Israel Hospital

Patrick Johnson

Retired Air Force Reserve Colonel

Did you know that more people in the United States experience a stroke than a heart attack?[2],[3] Each year, stroke kills twice as many women as breast cancer.[4] The prevalence and death rates from stroke vary widely across the U.S. However, in eight southern states, called the “Stroke Belt,” the death rate from stroke is 20% higher than the national average.[5] The stroke belt includes North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, Louisiana, and Arkansas.[6] However, anyone can be at risk for stroke despite where they live and several factors put some people at a higher risk.[7],[8]

When it comes to reducing your risk and increasing your chances of surviving a stroke, knowledge is key. In this media tour, Paul Singh, MD, MPH, BS, Assist. Professor Neuroendovascular Surgery and Vascular Neurology at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School; Associate Director, The Comprehensive Stroke Center at University Hospital and Co-Director, Primary Stroke Center at Newark Beth Israel Hospital along with a patient who has suffered an acute ischemic stroke, will be leading the discussion about the importance of learning the warning signs of stroke and the urgency of calling 9-1-1 and getting to a hospital immediately.

The acronym: F.A.S.T. (Face, Arm, Speech, Time) can be used as a quick screening tool: F=FACE, loss of function on one side of your face, which may look like drooping; A=ARMS, sudden weakness on one side, which may mean you can’t hold the arm up; S=SPEECH, like slurred speech; T=TIME, time to call 9-1-1.[9]

Immediate medical attention can be the deciding factor between recovery and disability, or even death, following a stroke.

 

Other Facts:

  • Close to 800,000 Americans have a stroke every year[10]
  • Stroke is the leading cause of serious, long-term disability and fifth leading cause of death in the US[11]
  • One in every three Americans does not know any of the warning signs of stroke[12]
  • Someone in the US dies of stroke every four minutes[13]

About Paul Singh, MD, MPH, BS

Dr. Singh completed his medical degree at the Medical College of Virginia in addition to a Masters in Public Health at George Washington University.  Dr. Singh is dual-boarded in Neurology and Vascular Neurology, which allows him to bring a unique niche in diagnosing a variety of vascular diseases of the brain and spine, including strokes, aneurysms, AVMs and tumors. He will also be launching new clinical research trials in strokes, providing patients the opportunity to participate in new therapies. Dr. Singh is currently on staff at the University Hospital and Newark Beth Israel Medical Center in New Jersey.

  

About Retired Colonel Patrick Johnson:

Patrick Johnson, a retired Air Force Reserve Colonel, never saw himself as a candidate for stroke. A vegetarian and an avid runner, Patrick believed he was in good health. In fact, he had taken his Air Force fitness test just three days before having his stroke.

“I had received an excellent score, which to me, reinforced the fact that I was fit and healthy,” said Patrick. “Then, I had a stroke.”

Patrick had gotten up in the middle of the night and on his way back to bed knew something was wrong. “I couldn’t move my left side, my speech was slurred and my face was drooping,” said Patrick. His wife and son, who are also both nurses, immediately recognized the signs of stroke and called 9-1-1.

Paramedics transported Patrick to the hospital within minutes. The stroke team confirmed through a CT scan that he had suffered a severe acute ischemic stroke. Less than two hours after Patrick’s initial onset of symptoms, he was administered treatment to break up the clot in his brain. Thanks to the treatment he received, he returned to work just six days later.

The doctors told Patrick his stroke was brought on by arrhythmias in his heart that caused blood clots to form. He now knows that – despite being in good health – anyone can suffer a stroke. He credits his ongoing recovery to his family, the paramedics and the hospital staff for taking all the appropriate actions to ensure that he received the best possible care.

“I was very fortunate that my family happened to be familiar with the signs and symptoms of stroke, knew to act quickly and get me the appropriate medical attention,” said Patrick. “I encourage everyone to talk to their friends and family about stroke. I know – firsthand – you truly never know what may happen.”

For more information about stroke, visit www.strokecall911.com

Support for this campaign is provided by Genentech Inc., a member of the Roche Group.

More About Stroke:

There are three main types of stroke that can occur.[14] About 87 percent of all strokes are acute ischemic strokes which occur when a clot in an artery or blood vessel cuts off blood flow to the brain.[15] Every minute lost increases the chance of stroke-related disability or death. If left untreated, acute ischemic stroke, can result in the loss of brain function, leading to disability or death.[16] There may be options available for some patients to help manage stroke.

 

[1] Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics—2014 Update. (2014). Circulation, p. 142. Retrieved March 6, 2017

[2] Stroke Facts. Retrieved March 24, 2017 from https://www.cdc.gov/stroke/facts.htm

[3] Heart Disease Facts. Retrieved March 24, 2017 from https://www.cdc.gov/heartdisease/facts.htm

[4] Women and Stroke. Retrieved March 24, 2017 from http://www.stroke.org/understand-stroke/impact-stroke/women-and-stroke

[5] Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics—2014 Update. (2014). Circulation, p. 142. Retrieved March 6, 2017

[6] Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics—2014 Update. (2014). Circulation, p. 142. Retrieved March 6, 2017

[7] What is Stroke? Retrieved March 15, 2017 from http://www.stroke.org/understand-stroke/what-stroke

[8] How Can I Monitor My Cholesterol, Blood Pressure and Weight? Retrieved March 24, 2016 from https:[email protected][email protected]/documents/downloadable/ucm_300461.pdf

[9] Spot a Stroke. Retrieved March 13, 2017 from http://www.strokeassociation.org/STROKEORG/WarningSigns/Stroke-Warning-Signs-and-Symptoms_UCM_308528_SubHomePage.jsp

[10] Stroke Facts. Retrieved March 24, 2017 from https://www.cdc.gov/stroke/facts.htm

[11] Stroke Facts. Retrieved March 24, 2017 from https://www.cdc.gov/stroke/facts.htm

[12] Together to End Stroke Spring 2014 Fact Sheet. Retrieved March 28, 2017 from http:[email protected][email protected][email protected]/documents/downloadable/ucm_462739.pdf

[13] Stroke Facts. Retrieved March 24, 2017 from https://www.cdc.gov/stroke/facts.htm

[14] Types of Stroke Fact Sheet. Retrieved March 10, 2017 from http://www.cdc.gov/stroke/types_of_stroke.htm

[15] Types of Stroke Fact Sheet. Retrieved March 10, 2017 from http://www.cdc.gov/stroke/types_of_stroke.htm

[16] Stroke 101: Fast Facts on Stroke. Retrieved March 28, 2017 from http://www.stroke.org/sites/default/files/resources/NSA_%20FactSheet_Stroke_101_2014.pdf

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