Dr. Don Mordecai: November 29, 2016

MENTAL ILLNESS AFFECTS AMERICANS FROM ALL WALKS OF LIFE; AND IT’S TREATABLE

New “Find Your Words” Campaign Created to Help Fight the Stigma of Depression and Offer Hope

 

dr-don-mordecai

Dr. Don Mordecai

Kaiser Permanente National Leader for Mental Health and Wellness
Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Stanford University Medical School

Millions of Americans are affected by depression and other mental illnesses. In fact, according to the National Institute of Mental Health, an estimated 16.1 million adults in the United States had at least one major depressive episode in the 2015 calendar year. Depression and other mental health issues touch all of our lives, because they are common and affect loved ones, friends, family members, co-workers and sometimes ourselves.

That is why the “Find Your Words” public health awareness effort was created. Through this campaign, Kaiser Permanente is encouraging people across the country to help reduce the stigma around depression and engage in a conversation about mental health issues. Mental health conditions, like depression, are treatable and people need to be reminded that there is hope.

On Tuesday, November 29th, Dr. Don Mordecai, a leading psychiatrist at Kaiser Permanente, will be available for interviews. He will tell your listeners more about the Find Your Words campaign, how to get involved and offer tips for mental health conditions. He will also share common signs/symptoms of depression, including:

  • feeling sad or hopeless nearly every day
  • losing interest in activities you used to enjoy
  • feeling too tired and drained to move through your day

More About Dr. Don Mordecai:

Don Mordecai is the Kaiser Permanente National Leader for Mental Health and Wellness, and Director of Mental Health and Chemical Dependency Services and Chair of the Chiefs of Psychiatry for The Permanente Medical Group (TPMG) in Northern California. Prior to these roles, Don was Chief of Psychiatry and Chief of Health Promotion for the Kaiser Permanente San Jose Medical Center.  He trained at Stanford as a child and adolescent, and adult psychiatrist.  His clinical work is with patients with developmental disorders, ADHD, and the range of general psychiatry issues.

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