Amy Aparicio Clark: September 14, 2016

FLORIDA NON-PROFITS AWARDED COMMUNITY GRANTS

CULTIVATING HEALTHY COMMUNITIES INITIATIVE DESIGNED TO PROMOTE HEALTHY EATING AND ACTIVE LIVING

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Amy Aparicio Clark

Senior Program Officer Aetna Foundation

 

The Aetna Foundation recently announced that it has awarded community grants to 3 Florida nonprofit organizations as part of its Cultivating Healthy Communities initiative. This program is designed to promote healthy eating and active living, strengthen health equity and advance innovations that make it possible for people to have more healthy days. The projects will benefit communities by improving health indicators such as access to healthy foods, increased physical activity, reduced incidences of bullying, more spaces for walking and biking safely and more.

This funding addresses the need to improve opportunities for all Americans—regardless of income, education or ethnic background—to take an active role in living healthier lives. The grantees have a track record of positively impacting what happens in Florida schools, child care centers, parks, corner stores and kitchen tables by giving youth and adults the skills and information to make good choices. These grants put the power to stay healthy in the hands of community residents—creating sustainable change that can improve health outcomes nationwide. Through Cultivating Healthy Communities, Florida was awarded $250,000 to implement programs benefitting Jacksonville and Miami youth.

On Wednesday, September 14th, Amy Aparicio Clark is available to you and your listeners to talk about the non-profit organizations who received the grants, the innovative programs that are addressing Florida’s  health challenges  and ways people can help to improve the health and vitality of their communities.

MORE ABOUT AMY APARICIO CLARK:

Amy Aparicio Clark, Senior Program Officer, is responsible for day-to-day management of the Foundation’s community-based grant making. She also applies her expertise in program evaluation to help optimize the Foundation’s other initiatives.

At EDC, Amy secured funding to establish the Postsecondary Access for Latino Middle-Grades Students project, which created a national network of schools that partner with families to promote education beyond high school for first-generation Latino college-goers. Amy began her career as teacher in a middle school dual-language immersion program in Framingham, Massachusetts.

Amy’s work has been published in Principal LeadershipASCD Express, and the Harvard Family Research Project’s Evaluation Exchange. She is on the board of directors for Kinsella Arts Incorporated.

She holds a master’s in education from Lesley University in Cambridge, MA, and a bachelor of arts in political science from Wellesley College. Amy is bilingual, having lived for many years in Lima, Peru.

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