Alan Yatvin & Crystal Jackson – ADA Safe At School Campaign – See more at: http://billmartinezlive.com/december-9-2015/#sthash.iFuF83mI.dpuf

AMERICAN DIABETES ASSOCIATION’S SAFE AT SCHOOL CAMPAIGN AIMS TO ENSURE ALL KIDS WITH DIABETES ARE MEDICALLY SAFE AT SCHOOL

Alan-Yatvin

 

Alan Yatvin, JD – Partner of Philadelphia law firm Popper & Yatvin, Board of Directors, American Diabetes Association

Crystal-Jackson

Crystal Jackson, BS, Director, Safe at School, American Diabetes Association and parent of a child with type 1 diabetes

 

 

Nearly 1 in 400 children younger than 20 live with diabetes. Diabetes must be managed 24/7, and proper care throughout the school day is essential in maintaining the health of these children.

 

The American Diabetes Association’s Safe at School campaign is dedicated to making sure all children with diabetes are medically safe at school, are treated fairly and have the same educational opportunities as their peers. This is accomplished through tools, resources and guidance provided to families by the Association’s legal advocates to aid in the development of written plans to avoid problems and to find solutions when problems do occur.

 

The Association, through Safe at School, has led the passage of state legislation to ensure that laws and policies do not present barriers to good diabetes management. Because of these efforts, 29 states and the District of Columbia now meet all three tenets of the Safe at School Campaign. These three tenets require schools to:

  • Allow trained school staff members to administer insulin;
  • Allow trained school staff members to administer glucagon; and
  • Allow capable students to self-manage their diabetes, anywhere, anytime.

 

The nurse is usually the provider of diabetes care in school. However, most schools do not have a full-time school nurse, and even a full-time school nurse cannot be in all places at all times. Therefore, it’s critical for the safety of students with diabetes for a small group of school employees to be trained to provide care to these children when the nurse isn’t available. Since children spend so much of their time participating in fieldtrips and afterschool activities, children who are able to do so should be allowed to self-manage their diabetes at school.

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